The case was afoot!

The case was afoot! Following where we left off, I was getting some concerning symptoms and, at the time, nothing that explained it. I ...

Thursday, 17 August 2017

The case was afoot!

The case was afoot!


Following where we left off, I was getting some concerning symptoms and, at the time, nothing that explained it. I did the sensible thing that anyone would do and I decided to visit my doctors. 

I went through the usual rigmarole of booking an appointment as everyone you have to get past the gatekeepers of the appointment diary... The receptionists. Now I have no issue with them personally, however, I do have an issue with them all the questions under the sun when they are not medically (or triage) trained.

Once 20 questions were finished I got my appointment, a doctor I hadn't heard of (I had been a patient at the same surgery since birth). This didn't concern me as you just trust in their judgement. A few days passed and my appointment had arrived. The Wednesday came and I promptly got to my doctor's surgery and sat patiently amongst the coughing and spluttering with a general feeling of there was nothing to be concerned about. I went in when called and gave all my concerns about my symptoms with my typing and judgement errors. My doctor took my blood pressure (unusually high for me) and then proceeded to check my reflexes (which I found unusual) and gave that concerning "Hmmm..." which instantly had my overthinking. Being the practical and doctor she seemed to be she advised that she was going to refer me to a neurologist at the hospital and I would hear from them by Monday. Confused as to why I was being referred I asked what was it for. My doctor advised that I had increased reflexes on one side and decreased on the other (that meant nothing to me) I did the standard "Ah ok... *Nod* " as if to say I understood. 

I left the doctors in a rather bemused state not being quite sure about what was happening but thought that if it was anything more serious they would have perhaps sent me to the hospital, little did I know, the moment I walked through my front door, I got a call. The same doctor I had just left. Without the usual introductions and pleasantries, you would generally expect she advised that she had spoken to the on call Neurologist Registrar (someone who deals with urgent queries and referrals on that chosen day) and was advised that I needed to go to the hospital a.s.a.p, no explanation just "The neurologist registrar wants to see you now, in the neurology department at the N&N.

I quickly grabbed my wallet and keys and jumped into my clapped out Toyota Corolla and made my way there, definitely worried and smoking like an absolute chimney in the car. Bear in mind at the time I lived 15 minutes away from the hospital, I must have smoked 4-5 cigarettes on that journey alone. 

So I got to the hospital, parked up and made my way inside the maze of corridors and was shown straight into the neurologist's office where I met a middle age gentleman who confirmed who he was and went over the information I had given to my doctor. He did the same tests my doctor had done, blood pressure being higher (unsurprisingly) and my reflexes showing the same concerning signs as before. The neurologist said "I'm afraid you're going to have to stay in tonight, we need an urgent MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scan and there was a possibility I was having a stroke.

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

So it begins....

As the title suggests this is where I will talk about the start of my journey.





My name is Andrew (Andy to my friends), I am 26 years old and live in Norfolk, United Kingdom. Prior to my MS (Multiple Sclerosis) diagnosis, I was the typical mid 20-year-old male. I enjoyed going out with my friends and family, enjoyed a few drinks every now and then and yes sadly I am a smoker (More on that later). 

I worked a typical day job handling insurance claims and also volunteered for an organisation that involved doing things much too fun and dangerous to describe here.

Before I go into how it all started for me, I just want to clarify prior to my diagnosis I was a healthy man (bar the occasional man-flu) so I was fairly used to just cracking on with life, doing the usual day-to-day chores/jobs and generally enjoying life.

It all started in October 2016, I was at one of my regular pool games (I play every Monday and Thursday evening in a pool league). Now, it was an average pool evening, I'm not the greatest player around but I certainly have improved over the years and made some good friends from it. So, I am at the pool table, enjoying myself, having my usual non-alcoholic drink (thanks to driving), when suddenly out of the blue it felt like someone had stabbed me in the head. The pain was something I had never experienced before in my life and I couldn't help myself but sit down, exactly where I was and clutch my head. I immediately decided it was a good idea to head home.

So, I get home and straight away head to my room with a drink and painkillers. Usually, when I get home from a pool night, I would check out my favourite YouTubers new videos on my iPad and just relax, however, that evening any light or noise just made me feel physically sick.


Roll on the next morning... and I am fine, the headache has disappeared and it felt like nothing had happened the night prior so naturally, I thought "Ah... just a migraine, pick up ya feet and crack on!"



My day job was to basically investigate claims from "Non-Fault" Insurers in accidents against "At-Fault" insurers and make sure that what they are claiming is what they did to their client's vehicle and to the cost claimed. So being the 21st century it's purely computer based.I loved my job. It involved concentration, negotiating and investigating and these were some of my favourite things to do but following that headache, I started noticing errors. Not just your average typos but errors that would make your Year 7 ICT teacher cringe on top of errors in judgement. Things didn't seem right. I decided it was time to see if there was something more serious at play here.